Immunology and hallucinogens…

…and the learning curve of delirium were the topic of this night’s magic mushroom “trip” or rather lack of a trip. I feel very tired as if I’ve been fighting something. When I started my research into psychedelics three years ago I was open to whatever the path would show me. Now three years later I reach the sober conclusion that my immune system has adapted to the toxological effects of magic mushrooms. My arthritis has gone. I freak out less. I have the paradoxical reaction of the return of depression after many years absence but also the development of a more refined sensitivity known in French as tristesse that in the classic bipolar way is alternated by statess of bliss that seem to come at random. There is a lack of inner agitation and a feeling of contentment. Yet there is much work to be done. The shadow of tuberculosis has returned to my life as an outbreak in my circle of friends has caused fifteen infections. As of yet we do not know the strain. I can only hope it’s not the multiple drug resistant variant. One of my best friends has been coughing up blood and presenting all the classic symptoms. Perhaps it is time to wake up to the silent epidemic on our doorstep. According to the WHO one third of the world’s population are infected with TB. I am one of them. At least according to the unreliable Tine test. I hope that my immune system is learning to cope. Joli weekend, mes amis!

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About Leighton Cooke

The Original Cookiemouse
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5 Responses to Immunology and hallucinogens…

  1. Mike E says:

    Well…Since you’re immune system learns to cope with the toxological effects of Magic Mushrooms…I’ll bet you’ve gained an Edge on the tb thing.

    Best Wishes

  2. sonia says:

    oh dear Leighton. I do hope your immune system is learning to cope.

    this business of the silent epidemic – it is worrying as a lot of people think TB is a thing of the past – clearly not so! It’s all very confusing still – I don’t feel the doctors help. Or in my case – they’ve confused me so much more.

    when i was starting university in the states in 2001 they had me tested for TB and claimed I had to be started on drugs as the test was positive. ! But they said it wasn’t ‘active’ yet – but there was a chance it might become so at any stage and i should go on this course of treatment. but that the treatment wouldn’t guarantee that i never would develop TB. it sounded like it wasn’t worth the effort then, so i signed some forms and they just said, make sure you go to the doctor if you have a cough or anything – to see if the TB becomes active.

    But the most confusing thing was they couldn’t say whether the positive result was due to the numerous times i’d had that silly test – ( due to this intl floating around and everyone wanting to test one) and the result that was showing up wasn’t something to worry about but my body indicating it had developed immunity and hence I was actually better off as a result – or if i had just had too much of the stuff injected into me and one day it would become active. . At any rate the one thing i got out of them was not to submit to any more of these tests. ( easier said than done – i could imagine going somewhere else and trying to repeat that tale…) in any case i signed some forms that let them off any liability and that was that.

    now im wondering how many people could potentially be in a similar situation? over-testing for TB leading to contracting TB?

  3. In America you probably did the Mantoux tuberculin test which it is claimed is pretty reliable. I shall have some more info tomorrow after the first meeting of our TB working party for health professionals. The Tine test I took is not so reliable. Were you innoculated as a child?

  4. One more point about the immune system. It is one thing to adapt to a metabolite that will leave the body after a short time and another to sustain an immune reaction to a microbe that remains in the body such as TB.

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